100% VETERAN OWNED

CONTACT US

(418) 446-3285

HOURS

MON - FRI    0900-1700

LOCATION

30 Quarry Ridge Rd, Barrie, ON L4M 7G1

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K-9 EXPLOSIVES DETECTION

HELPING PROTECT PEOPLE AND INFASTRUCTURES

BACKROUND

Our detection dogs provide a prompt and specialized response to bomb threats and other dangerous items that may present a threat to clients’ assets and lives.

TRAINING

Our K9 handlers participate in a six-week handler course and all have a background in military or police service. All working dogs are specifically selected and tested for each contract in order to ensure the most suitable Explosive Detection Dogs for the security of our clients and their assets.

QUALITY CONTROL

Our team tracks the number of training minutes canine teams conduct on a monthly basis, as well as the types of explosives and search areas used when training, to ensure teams maintain their proficiency in detecting explosive training aids.

Our K-9's are capable of being deployed into adverse conditions and are trained to perform the following operational tasks:

  • Entry control points (ECP)

  • Building sweeps

  • Open area/road sweeps (Soft & Hard surface)

  • Vehicle, vessels and aircraft sweeps

  • Package/luggage searchs

  • Airport sweeps

AVG: $200 - $500 PER ROOM

WHY DOGS?

A Dogs nose extends from the nostrils to the back of its throat, giving a dog an olfactory area 40 times greater than a human’s. Dogs have some 300 million olfactory receptor cells; humans have six million. 35 percent of a dog’s brain is assigned to smell-related operations. A human brain assigns only 5 percent of its cellular resources to smelling. When air enters a dog’s nose, it splits into two separate paths—one for breathing and one for smelling. And when a dog exhales, the air going out exits through a series of slits on the sides of a dog’s nose. This means that exhaled air doesn’t perturb the dog’s ability to analyze incoming odors; in fact, the outgoing air is even thought to help new odors enter. Even better, it allows dogs to smell continuously over many breathing cycles—one Norwegian study found a hunting dog that could smell in an unbroken airstream for 40 seconds over 30 respiratory cycles. Dogs can wiggle each nostril independently. It helps dogs locate precisely where a particular odor is coming from.

SAFETY

 Our detection K9 dogs are gentle, intelligent and non-threatening in nature.